adult's clothing · sewing · teen

Puff sleeved tees

A couple of blog posts ago I showed you some pattern pieces for puff sleeved tees.  I decided to mash together the SBCC tonic tee bodice with sleeves from the Pattern Emporium Hello Gorgeous tee. Given that I was using pattern pieces from different patterns, I thought that I should sew up a hopefully wearable muslin to check how they went together and to see what the fit was like.

Puff sleeved tee - SBCC Tonic Tee body with PE Hello Gorgeous sleeve

I used some scuba-ish scraps that were in stash for the muslin, but was forced by the shapes of the scraps to cut it with the greatest stretch going up and down rather than around. The girls could barely shimmy into it, although Stella found it easier than Clare.  She’s about one size smaller.  The fabric does have stretch in both directions, but not enough!

Puff sleeved tee - SBCC Tonic Tee body with PE Hello Gorgeous sleeve

Even though the wearable muslin turned out to be a pretty but mostly unwearable muslin, it showed me that the pattern mash would work, and both girls liked the fit of the tee and the shape of the neckline. Back to the stash!

Puff sleeved tee - SBCC Tonic Tee body with PE Hello Gorgeous sleeve

Oh, night-time photos in artificial lighting really do not show garments to their best advantage (nor do the tracksuit pants). I used a beautiful Liberty print knit (I think in rayon) that was a gift from a generous friend, and paired it with purple rib from Crafty Mamas Fabrics for the neckband and sleeve cuffs.

Puff sleeved tee - SBCC Tonic Tee body with PE Hello Gorgeous sleeve

I can just picture this in summer tucked into a denim mini or similar! Size wise it is the smallest size sleeve, and the XS petite bodice. I used the same size for Stella.

Puff sleeved tee - SBCC Tonic Tee body with PE Hello Gorgeous sleeve

This is a really sweet tee, but I am NEVER sewing with that fabric again. I used leftovers from a dress that I sewed for Stella last year. It’s from Spotlight, and the selvedge says that it is ‘powerhold stretch sports active’ knit. It feels soft, and she likes the fabric against her skin, but it’s a bugger to sew with. The machine does not like it at all.

Puff sleeved tee - SBCC Tonic Tee body with PE Hello Gorgeous sleeve

Anyway, I persevered, and hope that once summer arrives it will have been worth it and she’ll wear it heaps. I threw out all the scraps with great satisfaction.

Puff sleeved tee - SBCC Tonic Tee body with PE Hello Gorgeous sleeve

I quite like the current puffed sleeve trend (always makes me think of Anne of Green Gables).  It adds a bit of fun, and don’t we all need that!

adult's clothing · sewing · teen · tween

Shorts and top for Stella

I am in a couple of Facebook groups run by pattern designers. One of them is for George and Ginger patterns. I often find styles there that work well for my daughters. Recently they were testing the Heat Wave shorts pattern to improve the draft before re-release, and I put my hand up to give it a go in the smallest teen size for Stella.

Pattern Emporium Unwind top with George and Ginger Heat Wave shorts

These shorts are designed to be sewn in knit fabrics. I had a length of Liverpool knit that came to me via Restash, but I think was originally from Lush Fabrics and came to the original owner via a Frocktails goodie bag! I’m glad that it eventually made it’s way to me.

Pattern Emporium Unwind top with George and Ginger Heat Wave shorts

This fabric has a nice crepe type of texture, and is a nice mid-weight. It’s also very stretchy. As per the pattern page for the Heat Wave Hot Pants, the most popular types of fabrics for these shorties are 2-way heavyweight knit with structure, such as ponte, Liverpool and cotton lycra. However, any knit fabric with at least 50% stretch will work.

Pattern Emporium Unwind top with George and Ginger Heat Wave shorts

The shorts rely on the fabric stretch for fitting. There are darts in the front and back for shaping, and optional pockets in the front. There are two options for the waistband width. They pull on – there are no fastenings or even elastic. Fabric choice is vital to make these work! Many of the testers had some issues with pocket gaping, but we didn’t consider it to be problematic considering the nature of the garment – a knit, pull-on short.

Pattern Emporium Unwind top with George and Ginger Heat Wave shorts

There was enough fabric left over to sew a simple top. I already had the Pattern Emporium Unwind top printed and taped in Stella’s size, so cut and sewed it up in the cut on short sleeved version. You can probably guess how fast this top was to make! All construction was on the overlocker, with the sewing machine used for hems and to secure the neckband seam allowances.

Pattern Emporium Unwind top with George and Ginger Heat Wave shorts

I think that we’re still unsure as to whether this is a summer outfit or a pair of summer pyjamas! Either way, both pieces are comfortable and easy to wear either together or mixed with other wardrobe items (no matter what time of day).

adult's clothing · sewing · teen

Pattern Emporium Follow Me wrap dress for Clare

I am sure that you’ve worked out by now that my sewing is all over the place this year in terms of seasonality.  I’m really just sewing as the mood takes me.  Clare rather likes wrap skirts and flounces; she’s tried on plenty in the shops but as is often the case, we’ve generally been unhappy with the fit.  Back to the usual solution – me and my sewing room!

Pattern Emporium Follow Me wrap dress in Spotlight poly spandex

The Pattern Emporium Follow Me wrap dress and skirt pattern took our fancy because of the combination of wrap skirt with a ‘regular’ bodice.  This removed issues related to gaping necklines etc while still keeping the overall ‘vibe’ of the wrap skirt, especially in combination with a flounce on the skirt and equally flouncy sleeves.

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The centre back bodice seam allows for a closer fit and in combination with the waist seam there weren’t any issues with the back waist being too long and having pooling of excess fabric.  The sleeves are full circles, with a hole set off-centre that is attached to the armscye.

Pattern Emporium Follow Me wrap dress in Spotlight poly spandex

 

Pattern Emporium Follow Me wrap dress in Spotlight poly spandex

The neckline was finished with a band, with the seam allowances stitched down.  It’s the higher of the round neckline options (there is also low round and deep scoop).  I am trying hard to remember what size I sewed for Clare; I suspect it was size 6 top graded to 8 waist.  The fabric came from Restash but was originally sold at Spotlight.  It’s a fairly slippery polyester knit, one of my least favourite fabrics to sew.  I pulled out my overlocker manual and did rolled hems around the bottoms of the sleeve and the skirt flounce.  Another use for the pale blue cones of overlocker thread that I bought when making Clare’s formal dress last year!

Pattern Emporium Follow Me wrap dress in Spotlight poly spandex

Construction was almost all on the overlocker.  Clare’s dress is the mini length.  There is enough overlap in the skirt front wraps that it doesn’t rise up and expose your undies if it gets windy – or if you’re twirling!

Pattern Emporium Follow Me wrap dress in Spotlight poly spandex

From the pattern page: Allow the Follow Me Knit Dress & Skirt to take you on a journey of style, discovery & self expression. By combining different style options, lengths, hemlines & details with a variety of knit fabrics from drapey to full bodied, you can fill your wardobe with a whole range of unique skirts and dresses from just the one pattern. Enjoy the playfulness of a wrap with the peace of mind of a fixed waistline & plentiful coverage so you never have to worry about flashing your bra or knickers! All in the comfort of your fave stretch knit fabrics.

DRESS OPTIONS:
  • Wrap front with subtle hilo hemline.
  • Plain or flounce detail.
  • Fitted bodice.
  • 5 Sleeve options : sleeveless, cap, short, long sleeve or flounce
  • Necklines: High & low round, plus deep scoop.
  • Banded finish.
  • 4 lengths : mini, mid, knee & below knee lengths.
  • Excellent coverage of knickers & bra.

Pattern Emporium Follow Me wrap dress in Spotlight poly spandex

I also sewed this as a fit test for a potential valedictory/graduation dress. Since then Clare has decided that she fancies a different dress style – so I’ll be sewing up a muslin of Lekala 2124 during the school holidays. Although we know the traditional valedictory dinner won’t be taking place this year, she’ll still get a dress!

Pattern Emporium Follow Me wrap dress in Spotlight poly spandex

I am sure that we’ll get plenty of use from this pattern.  There’s the option to sew it as a skirt, rather than a dress.  It’s multi-sized, so I might even sew a version of it for myself at some stage!  As with all Pattern Emporium patterns, there are plenty of photos of various versions of the dress on a wide variety of shapes and sizes on the pattern page – you can nearly always find someone of a similar size and shape to yourself so that you can get an idea of whether you fancy it too.  There’s also an extremely active Facebook group.

adult's clothing · kids clothing · sewing · teen · tween

Pattern Emporium Unwind sweater

After sewing Clare’s french terry top, I couldn’t be bothered folding up the fabric and putting it away.  Height of laziness!  There was still plenty, and it seemed logical to use up some more.

Pattern Emporium Unwind sweater

The recently released Pattern Emporium Unwind Sweater-Jumper-Hoodie pattern seemed to be an obvious choice to pair with lightweight french terry. From the pattern website: Sweater, jumper*, sweatshirt, windcheater, sloppy-joe or pullover. Whatever you want to call it, the Unwind is pure comfort. It’s so easy going & relaxed you’re going to want to wear one all the time, in #allthefabrics and #allthestyles. And one of the best things… when it comes to choosing fabrics, there really isn’t a right or wrong. She works in both 2-way & 4-way stretch. Winter & Summer. Everything about the Unwind is relaxed: the fit, the cuffs and the hem band. All are designed to hang & move freely on the body unlike the more hugging band styles that you may be more familiar with. *AUSSIE TRANSLATION: In Australia we refer to a ‘sweater’ as a jumper. A ‘sweatshirt’ is called a sloppy joe, windcheater & even jumper. Universally, a hoodie is a hoodie.

  • Easy fit batwing shape.
  • Body & sleeve all in one.
  • 4 Necklines – crew, relaxed, turtle, hood.
  • 3 Sleeves – cuffed long & 1/2 sleeve, short sleeve.
  • Relaxed cuff & hem band.
  • 3 Lengths – cropped, hip & long length.
  • Designed for stretch knit fabrics.
  • Regular & tall cutting lines.
  • Trans-seasonal.
  • Lots of pattern hack/mash options.

Unwind sweater line drawing

When this pattern was first released I thought ‘nah, I have a million relaxed top patterns in my stash’.  Turns out that I had room for a million and one more.  I think that a clincher for me was the size range – this one starts at teen size 4, and goes up to size 24.  The size 4 was perfect for Stella.

Pattern Emporium Unwind sweater

Stella chose the long cuffed sleeve version, at the cropped length. As you can see it’s not super cropped – rather, it’s just below the waist. She also wanted the plain crew neckline (I suggested the hoodie, but was outvoted).  This was incredibly fast to sew, as you’d imagine. Front and back shoulder seams, neck band added, side seams sewn, hem band and sleeve cuffs added.  I did remember to have her try on the top for sleeve length before adding the sleeve cuffs, and had to cut about two inches off the sleeve length.

Pattern Emporium Unwind sweater

I used the overlocker for construction, but as per usual used my sewing machine to topstitch down the seam allowances to add some detail and structure. In this case it included alongside the shoulder/sleeve seam. I also popped a little Kylie and the Machine label into the side seam.

Pattern Emporium Unwind sweater

And then there’s the transfer! This is another iron-on transfer from Spotlight (you can buy them online; no need for an ‘essential’ in-person visit to the shops at the moment). I followed the instructions to iron it on with a decent amount of pressure, and it’s stood up nicely to a couple of trips through the washing machine since. These transfers really are a nice way to ‘fancy’ up an otherwise very plain garment.

Pattern Emporium Unwind sweater

After sewing this top, there was still french terry left over that I couldn’t be bothered folding up and putting away……

adult's clothing · sewing · teen

Top for Clare

My sewing machines were back from being serviced just in time for some school holiday sewing.  This top for Clare was a complete impulse sew.

top traced from RTW with Spotlight transfer

When we were in Borneo in January (gee, that feels like a different lifetime ago) Clare bought a cropped sweatshirt style top that she’s really enjoyed wearing. I pulled it out of her wardrobe and traced around it to make a pattern to copy. So simple! Then I dived into my stash and found a rather large piece of Clear It french terry that I knew would be perfect.

top traced from RTW with Spotlight transfer

Front, back sleeves, cuffs, hem band and neck band. Construction was all on the overlocker, with the band seam allowances secured with topstitching. And the final touch? A transfer!

top traced from RTW with Spotlight transfer

The Jocelyn Proust transfer came from Spotlight – I ordered a few online during a recent sale. It was surprisingly easy to iron on, and it’s held up well through a few washes.

top traced from RTW with Spotlight transfer

Clare likes that it finishes at her waist, and that the hemline isn’t super wide (the side seams angle in a bit from the underarm toward the hemline). It’s a nice light extra layer. It’s very difficult to capture the colour of the fabric accurately on the screen – in real life it’s a blue that is very close to purple; maybe lavender is a good description!

top traced from RTW with Spotlight transfer

I didn’t use up all the fabric on this top….stay tuned for my next blog post!

adult's clothing · sewing · teen · tween

True Bias Rio Ringer tees

I kicked off my May nojourn (since I couldn’t actually go away to Sewjourn) sewing a tee for Clare.  I chose the True Bias Rio Ringer tee, as Clare likes retro styled garments. I had some soft knit scraps that were large enough for a teen sized tee, so sewed up a muslin in size 0, graded up to size 4 through the hips.

True Bias Rio Ringer Tee

It looked to fit great through the shoulders and the body, but Clare said that it gave her a major underarm wedgie. Size 0 armhole depth was definitely not enough! So I ferreted through the stash again and found some more soft knit scraps, then reprinted and retaped the pattern. This time I sewed 4 length/armhole depth and hip width, with a size 0 shoulder width and bust/waist.

True Bias Rio Ringer Tee

It fits well, with no armpit wedgie! Hooray!

True Bias Rio Ringer Tee

I really like the sleeve and neck band technique on this tee. It does require rib knit – I used chocolate brown for the first tee that I made, and green rib knit for this one. As with many things, having quality rib knit really helps! I suspect that these are both from Crafty Mamas Fabrics (they’ve both been in stash for a little while). You need rib with excellent recovery for this to sit as it should.

True Bias Rio Ringer Tee

From the True Bias website: The Rio pattern is a ringer style T-shirt and casual dress. View A is a fitted top that hits around the hip. View B is a semi-fitted dress ending just above the knee. Both views have contrasting ribbing around the crew neckline and short sleeves for a slightly vintage look. Suggested Main Fabrics: Light to medium weight knit fabrics with 40% or more stretch such as cotton interlock, T-shirt jersey, and merino wool jersey. Suggested Binding Fabrics: Light to medium weight knit fabrics with 75% or more stretch such as rib knit.

Rio Ringer tee line drawing

Fortunately for me, the first attempt at this tee was not a wasted garment – there is a slightly smaller teenager in the house!

True Bias Rio Ringer Tee

The mostly size 0 is just fine for Stella, who is a fraction shorter and smaller overall than her older sister, but with a very similar shape. She’s actually worn this quite a lot, as she particularly likes the soft fabric.

True Bias Rio Ringer Tee

You might recognise the fabric for both of the tees – it’s from Darn Cheap Fabrics, and I used it for these Jalie tees.

True Bias Rio Ringer Tee

These are quick to sew (unsurprisingly – they’re a basic tee!) and now that I’ve got the fit right for each daughter and have practiced sewing the rib trim, I will be able to sew up plenty more in fabric that is more to their choosing.  They don’t necessarily want to be matchy-matchy with their dad!

True Bias Rio Ringer Tee

miscellaneous · musings · planned projects · sewing · teen

Planning

So, here in Melbourne we’re planning for Clare to return to school on Tuesday (she’s in year 12), and then for Stella (year 7) to return two weeks later.  It’s great to have some dates – I feel as though it gives a little bit of certainty (although in reality, anything could change and nothing is set in stone) and helps us to stumble toward a new normal.  I’m still working from home until the end of the school term, which means I will be able to drive the kids to and from school and they won’t need to take public transport.  And term three?  For me it will probably be a mix of working on site, working from home, and travelling interstate.  That is really difficult for me to comprehend at the moment.  Who knows.  We’ll see.  The girls will hopefully be continuing on with school at school, but we still don’t know when their extracurricular activities will start back on site instead of on Zoom.

It a whole other time of big change.  There has been so much change, so quickly, and in some ways we’ve just settled in to our at-home routines.  Now it all changes again, with an added dose of heightened anxiety while we wait to see what cautious re-emergence and return to more ‘usual’ activities has on the number of covid-19 infections and how the health system is able to manage them.  Clare has caught up with her group of ten friends a couple of times now in a local park, we’ve had drinks at a friend’s house, had a couple of friends pop over, and I met up in a group of ten school mums at the park yesterday morning for our regular coffee/chai.  We’ve all been keeping in touch and meeting up online since stay-at-home started back in March, but it’s just SO nice to see people in three dimensions!  It takes a lot to resist that impulse to give someone a hug, epecially after that time away from from them.  We’re especially looking forward to seeing my parents in a few weeks time (they live a couple of hours away and are in the high-risk category) so let’s hope that things continue to go well.

I’m sure that many of you have read or seen a meme that has been going around since the pandemic began pointing out that while we are all in the same storm, we are not all in the same boat; some are on super-yachts, and some have just the one oar (author Damien Barr, on Twitter).

I heard that we are all in the same boat.
But it’s not that.
We are in the same storm, but not in the same boat.
Your ship can be shipwrecked and mine might not be.
Or vice versa.
For some, quarantine is optimal: a moment of reflection, or reconnection.
Easy in flip flops, with whisky or tea.
For others, this is a desperate crisis.
For others, it is facing loneliness.
For some, peace, rest time, vacation.
Yet for others, torture: How am I going to pay my bills?
Some were concerned about a brand of chocolate for Easter.
Others were concerned about the bread for the weekend, or if the noodles would last for a few more days.
Some were in their “home office”.
Others are looking through trash to survive.
Some have experienced the near death of the virus, some have already lost someone from it, some are not sure their loved ones are going to make it, and some don’t even believe this is a big deal.
Some of us who are well now may end up experiencing it, and some believe they are infallible and will be blown away if or when this hits someone they know.
So, friends, we are not in the same boat.
We are going through a time when our perceptions and needs are completely different. And each one will emerge, in his own way, from that storm.
It is very important to see beyond what is seen at first glance.
Not just looking, more than looking, seeing.
See beyond the political party, beyond biases, beyond the nose on your face. Do not judge the good life of the other, do not condemn the bad life of the other.
Don’t be a judge.
Let us not judge the one who lacks, as well as the one who exceeds.
We are on different ships looking to survive.
Let everyone navigate their route with respect, empathy and responsibility.

Clare and I have begun planning a graduation/valedictory dinner dress.  Who knows if there will be a graduation/valedictory dinner, but she’ll have a dress for whatever way we choose to celebrate!  She gave me these pictures as inspiration.

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Essentially, a fitted underslip, preferably in a contrasting colour, with a sheer embroidered dress over the top. I went busily googling, and found this beautiful embroidered tulle from Silk World. And it was on sale!

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We ordered a few metres and it arrived a couple of days later, much to our shock and amazement! Parcels have been taking weeks longer than usual to arrive, with so many people doing their shopping online instead of in person, so it was a big surprise for this one to arrive so quickly. And it looks fabulous in reality.

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Clare is thinking of a pale green slip to go underneath. I have a few patterns in stash that I am considering, both for the slip and for the overdress. This one should work fine for a stretch slip – I’ll just need to lengthen it a bit. And will need to find the right fabric for it. 2020-05-12 07.18.56-1

These are current contenders for the overdress, although they are designed for knit fabrics. I would probably do a bit of pattern mashing or variation.

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McCalls have just released this pattern too, which is another contender. 20200520_182104

We have plenty of time to let the ideas marinate or percolate. I am also still considering a completely different option for her, because I adore the fabric. Clare’s 18th birthday is in January, so I can make an excuse for another ‘dressy’ dress! I bought this fabric from The Cloth Shop early in the year. It was the last of the roll and is an amazing border print.

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One of my talented Melbourne sewing friends used this fabric to sew herself a stunning dress from a vintage Advance pattern for Frocktails a couple of years ago. So spectacular!

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We have a few patterns under consideration, wanting to make the most of the border print, and of Clare’s preference for a fitted bodice and fuller skirt.  Although we don’t have masses of fabric to work with, Clare is pretty small so hopefully we can tetris bodice pieces out without much hassle.

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New Look 6526

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By the time either of those dresses gets made you will have completely forgotten about ths blog post, but it will help me to keep track of our thought processes. I quite enjoy having a ‘slow burn’ project in the background, especially after the positive experience of sewing last year’s formal dress without any time pressures.

adult's clothing · sewing · teen

Teen Spirit top

When we were in Borneo Clare bought a cropped sweatshirt.  It is fairly lightweight, so perfect for inbetween weather.   She’s been wearing it a lot, so I offered to sew her something similar.  This was made and photographed at the beginning of March.

George and Ginger Teen Spirit top

This pattern is the Teen Spirit Top, by George and Ginger. I love that their multi-sized patterns start at small sizes (tween 12 and 14 then adult XXS) which makes sewing for my daughters much easier.

photo_feb_02_11_04_57_am_740x

We chose to sew the long sleeved, cropped length and I narrowed the neckline. I added bands to the sleeves and the hem to tie them in with the neckband.

George and Ginger Teen Spirit top

The fabric is a knit from the Rathdowne Fabrics remnant bin. It’s actually fairly stable, without much stretch at all, and has a bit of a slub effect. Heavier weight than jersey, lighter weight than sweatshirting.

George and Ginger Teen Spirit top

Current teen fashions are SO late 80s / early 90s! I look at some of Clare’s outfits and then describe to her almost identical onces that I wore back in the day. She wishes that I’d held on to a few of them. I have kept most of my late 80s / early 90s formal wear, but not the everyday stuff.  She’s especially sad that I didn’t hold on to my nubuck Doc Martens (my excuse is that they were trashed after a year of backpacking).

George and Ginger Teen Spirit top

I added a little label from Kylie and the Machine to the side seam, which really tickled Clare’s fancy! I think that I also added one inside that says ‘this is the back’.

George and Ginger Teen Spirit top

As you can imagine, this was an extremely straightforward garment to cut out and sew. Adding the bands made for very simple finishing. I pressed them all toward the body of the garment then topstitched to keep the seam allowances in place and add a tiny bit of detail. And that was it! Sometimes the very simple projects are just as satisfying as the very complex ones – it’s all about meeting the brief.

George and Ginger Teen Spirit top

adult's clothing · sewing · teen

Grecian goddess sundress

The school swimming carnival was four weeks ago!  Four weeks ago, in what feels like a different world and different lifetime.  Clare is in year 12 (final year of high school), so instead of having to wear PE uniform this year she got to dress according to a house ‘theme’.  Clare is in Clare House and their house colour is white.   The theme chosen was ‘goddess’. Out with the sheets!

Grecian Goddess Sundress

We have plenty of old white sheets in the cupboard, and I remembered that there was a free pattern online for a Grecian Sundress. I printed it out and cut it out at the smallest size. The main challenge was gathering the shoulders enough – I should have just done casings and threaded through some cord to pull it up tight; normal gathering with two rows of thread just wasn’t strong enough to pull tight enough gathers in this sheet. In the end I did a running stitch through it by hand with doubled thread so that I could manipulate the gathers more and tighten them.

Grecian Goddess Sundress

It was cool in the morning when they headed off to the carnival, so Clare layered a white tee that I’d made some years earlier underneath. I was pretty impressed with the waist shirring. My sewing machine generally doesn’t like to shir, but I remembered that if I reduced the bobbin tension about a quarter of a turn, it would be okay. And it was! Although I had to refill the bobbin about four times in order to do that amount of shirring. Tedious.

Grecian Goddess Sundress

The girls had lots of fun at the carnival; Stella managed to find herself a job as mascot for her house.

Grecian Goddess Sundress

Grecian Goddess Sundress Grecian Goddess Sundress

This is actually a rather lovely, simple dress pattern. Although this one is very much a costume, I’ll pull out the pattern again and sew it up in a proper dress fabric at some stage. Clare really likes a bit of shirring, and is very pleased that I’ve figured out how to do it effectively on my sewing machine.

Grecian Goddess Sundress

adult's clothing · sewing · teen · tween

Kami skirt for Clare

Short tiered skirts are in all the teen shops at the moment.  Every time Clare points them out, I say ‘I could sew that’.  Then I procrastinate, because I know I’ll need to figure out lengths and proportions and sometimes thinking is hard.  But as it turned out, I didn’t have to do any mental gymnastics, because (unsurprisingly) there is a tutorial for exactly the sort of skirt that Clare wanted.

Kami skirt by The Hemming in cotton from Borneo

The tutorial is called the Kami Skirt, and it’s from a blog called The Hemming. She provides the measurements for Australian sizes 6 (60cm waist) to 16 (85cm waist).  I used the size 8 measurements as a guide for Clare.

Kami skirt by The Hemming in cotton from Borneo

This is another Borneo souvenir garment! Clare chose this printed cotton (actually, it feels as though it has some viscose content as it’s quite soft) at Fabriko in Kuching. Once again I took advantage of the border print by cutting the lower tier on the crossgrain. I used the full length of the fabric we’d bought, which was less than the pattern suggestion, but it still worked out okay. It just means that the lower tier in Clare’s skirt is less full than that in the tutorial. Still seems to have an adequate level of twirl and swish!

Kami skirt by The Hemming in cotton from Borneo

Rather than roll hemming the skirt, I chose to do folded and stitched hems. It’s always slightly awkward to attach the lower tier on the outside of the top tier to create the little frill – you need to make sure that it’s overlapped evenly right along. I’d turned a hem, so that also formed a ‘line’ that I could feel so that I could line it up evenly.

Kami skirt by The Hemming in cotton from Borneo

It’s one piece wide elastic in the waist, sewn through to give the appearance of three channels. The tie is just for decoration – it’s non-functional. It took me four episodes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer to cut out and sew this skirt, and I think it would be even faster to sew a second time. But how many of these skirts does a teen need in her wardrobe? I’m not sure.

Kami skirt by The Hemming in cotton from Borneo

The top that she’s wearing with the skirt was bought in Kota Kinabalu, at E-teen (like Supre). I can’t claim credit for sewing the top, just the skirt.