adult's clothing · sewing

Mavis, Cassie and My Embrace

This time around I have a couple of new to me patterns, topped off with a repeat.  First up, the new; Style Arc Mavis knit tunic and Style Arc Cassie stretch woven pants.

Style Arc Mavis tunic, Cassie pants and Pattern Emporium My Embrace cardigan

How about I start with the tunic? From the Style Arc website: This wonderful long line tunic is not only fashionable but comfortable and versatile as well. Design your own look by using contrast insert panels. We used a matching rib knit as a contrast. FABRIC SUGGESTION: Knit, Baby Wool, light Ponte, Jersey or any sweater knit.

mavis-tunic

I sewed mine in a lightish weight printed knit that was given to me, but I have a feeling was originally available from Tessuti. Such a great colourway for me! I used the same fabric throughout rather than taking up the opportunity to use a contrast in the inset panels and for the collar, but at some stage I will probably give that a go as well.

Style Arc Mavis tunic, Cassie pants and Pattern Emporium My Embrace cardigan

I used topstitching to highlight the seam lines throughout and to provide a bit of stability. I like that the collar is set into a V shaped neckline. It was easy enough to insert via sewing machine, ensuring that I started and ended the stitching at the point of the V.

Style Arc Mavis tunic, Cassie pants and Pattern Emporium My Embrace cardigan

I sewed size 12, but would do a high rounded back / forward neck alteration next time – it’s a bit chokey at the front for my liking. Overall this pattern is a winner for me; it’s straightforward to sew and is easy to wear.

Style Arc Mavis tunic, Cassie pants and Pattern Emporium My Embrace cardigan

So, to the pants! I’ve looked at this pattern for years. From the Style Arc website: These are a great ankle length elastic pull on pant featuring a tucked knee patch and design line treatment. A must have pant of the moment. FABRIC SUGGESTION & DESCRIPTION: Stretch Bengaline is perfect!

 

cassie-pant

Do take note of the angle of the seam above the knee; it reality it is angled the opposite way to the fashion illustration, but the same way as the line drawing. I sewed these in size 10, in a stretchy textured jacquard from Super Cheap Fabrics. Your woven needs plenty of stretch to work well in this style.

Style Arc Mavis tunic, Cassie pants and Pattern Emporium My Embrace cardigan

I was concerned that the front knee piece might not fall in the correct spot for me, since I am short, but decided to just make this one up as per the pattern, and it’s worked out okay. Even though I’m 158cm tall, my leg length is long as compared to my torso (not that you can always tell in what are often quite foreshortened photographs). I shortened the pants an inch or so at the hemline, but didn’t muck around with the pattern pieces any higher up (I normally do).

Style Arc Mavis tunic, Cassie pants and Pattern Emporium My Embrace cardigan

Next time I make the pants I will do a full belly alteration – these are fairly comfortable once on, but I have to wriggle in to them a little more than I’d like! I need to add an inch or two to the front stomach area, and the elasticised waistband. Otherwise this is a nice addition to my stretch pants pattern collection.

Style Arc Mavis tunic, Cassie pants and Pattern Emporium My Embrace cardigan

I topped it all off with a Pattern Emporium My Embrace cardigan. This is a pattern that I’ve sewn before, and I sewed this one exactly the same as the last. Size 14, knee length ‘short person’, with long fitted sleeve. This fabric is a medium gauge knit, so has terrific drape and is relaxed enough for the cuffs to fit over the tunic beneath.

Style Arc Mavis tunic, Cassie pants and Pattern Emporium My Embrace cardigan

Construction was on the overlocker, and the hems were finished with a single turn to the inside of about 5/8″, then a zig zag. Using the zig zag effectively allowed for the raw edges to be finished at the same time as securing the hem. It also had the benefit of not stretching out the knit. I often feel that the zig zag is underestimated as a hem finish – particularly on knits!

Style Arc Mavis tunic, Cassie pants and Pattern Emporium My Embrace cardigan

Holidays finish for me today; I’m back to working (from home) again tomorrow, and Clare will be back at school (Stella gets another week of holidays while the state government figures out whether the rest of the kids will be returning to on site or to remote learning).  These school holidays have not felt like holidays; I’m not feeling rested or reinvigorated at all.  But am so grateful that we still have work.

 

adult's clothing · sewing

More repeats! Jalie 2918 and Thread Theory Finlayson sweater

June is birthday month for my family – Stella, me, then my husband.  Clare’s is in January.  I generally sew something for each family member when it’s their birthday.  I went with two old favourites for my husband this year.

Jalie 2918 in knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

You guessed it – it’s good old Jalie 2918 again! This time I sewed a long sleeved version – it’s winter after all. I have this pattern traced on to non-fusible interfacing, which sticks a little to the fabric so doesn’t even need pinning on. Makes it super fast to cut out and to sew.

Jalie 2918 in knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

The ‘nope’ fabric comes from Darn Cheap Fabrics, and if you think it looks familiar, that’s because I sewed him a short-sleeved version in the yellow colourway a few months ago (and used the leftovers of the yellow colourway to test out the True Bias Rio ringer tee pattern a few blog posts ago). It’s beautiful quality; medium weight, super soft and squishy, with just the right amount of elastane.

Jalie 2918 in knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

I don’t think that I’m ever going to be able to get him to pose in a relaxed and comfortable manner. The other garment I sewed is the Thread Theory Finlayson sweater. You can find previous versions here.

Thread Theory Finlayson sweater in knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

Once again the fabric comes from Darn Cheap Fabrics. It’s a printed stripe, traditional windcheater fabric in cotton/poly with a brushed fleecy back. I used black rib for the cuffs and bottom band rather than trying to sew them in the self fabric.

Thread Theory Finlayson sweater in knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

It’s such a nice collar! I’ve sewn it often enough that I find it quite easy to attach, and the instructions are very clear.

Thread Theory Finlayson sweater in knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

Back view photos are always interesting, because they reveal a lot about posture! In this case you can also check out the stripe matching down the sleeve seamline. The other seamlines are matched too! The key to straightforward stripe matching is the cutting out – cut out in a single layer if possible, and match key points across pattern pieces (like the armhole seamline).

Thread Theory Finlayson sweater in knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

Maybe he’s looking up at the sky wondering what the rest of 2020 will bring…..

adult's clothing · sewing

True Romance with a little Exhale

At the moment I’m flirting with statement sleeves.  I don’t like them to be impractical, but do like the overall look.  I sewed up the Pattern Emporium True Romance bishop sleeve top back in 2018, and decided to give the pattern another whirl.

Pattern Emporium True Romance top with modified neckline

I actually like this one more than the first! I did a few things differently. Obviously, the fabric. This is wool/acrylic blend, fairly light weight, that I bought at Super Cheap Fabrics ages ago. It gathers beautifully into the full length elasticised cuff. This is the ‘dramatic’ sleeve option.

Pattern Emporium True Romance top with modified neckline

I decided to leave off the bottom band, so lengthened the body a couple of inches. I could have lengthened it a little more but was working with a limited amount of fabric, so this was it! Size-wise, it’s 12 throughout, without any alterations.

Pattern Emporium True Romance top with modified neckline

From their website: The bishop sleeve is a gorgeously classic design that has made a comeback both on the catwalk & in our favourite fashion stores. We have have designed a simple bishop sleeve pattern with lots of options & finishes for you to sew. FEATURES: To get the most out of this feminine trend, this pattern includes 3 bodice shapes to fit & flatter a range of bodies, styles and, of course, show off your pretty bishop sleeves.

  • 2 Bishop Sleeve Styles : Subtle & Dramatic.
  • 3 Sleeve Finishes : Cuff, Shirred or Elastic.
  • 3 Silhouettes : Banded, Flared & Tee.
  • Boat Neckline.

Screen Shot 2018-08-30 at 12.57.01 pm

Screen Shot 2018-08-30 at 12.56.46 pm

Last time I sewed the boat neckline, but I didn’t really find it great to wear. Instead, I used the high round neckline from the Exhale pattern.

exhale-top-hi-low-hilow-hem-pattern-emporium-sewing-patterns_e4094051-4796-4a9f-a9df-2b1b7a830902_480x480

It’s definitely worth mashing patterns together and it’s particularly easy to do when they’re from the same designer – and this company actively encourages it.

Pattern Emporium True Romance top with modified neckline

It’s almost as quick to sew this top as a regular tee!  It’s mostly constructed on the overlocker, with the machine used to secure the bottom ham (with a zig-zag) and the sleeve casings for the elastic.  Very straightforward, with a pleasing result.

adult's clothing · sewing

Remy Raglan

Today I have a pattern that I haven’t sewn before!  And it’s a newly released one.

Sew House 7 Remy Raglan in foiled linen

This is the Sew House 7 Remy Raglan. From their website:  The Remy Raglan is a simple top that is quick to make and easy to wear with a relaxed fit. This top was originally designed to wear under the Burnside Bibs and with the Free Range Slacks during their respective photoshoots. Many customers inquired about the top and so it became the Remy Raglan pattern. This top was designed to have the sleeves rolled up and it should be noted the sleeves look best that way. The fit is very loose and relaxed at the bust and waist and while it is not a cropped top, it is a short top designed to be worn with high waist pants and skirts. The original design is version #1, plain and simple, however, version #2 offers a little visual interest to the front with a split center and keyhole button closure. There are two sleeve options – short sleeve and 3/4- length sleeves and both work with either versions #1 or #2. This top was originally designed for very light weight linen. While it can work in a variety of light weight woven fabrics, this top is the perfect, simple backdrop to let a beautiful linen shine. If you choose a more rigid fabric such as cotton lawn, the neck may appear a little smaller and the bottom hem will be a bit fuller and not drape as closely to the body. Also be aware that one-sided printed fabrics will not look good once the sleeves are rolled up. Be sure that the front and back sides of your fabric are presentable. Remy Raglan line drawing I have plenty of linen leftovers in my stash, and thought that this would be the perfect pattern for me to use to do some colour blocking. That said, I used one fabric for my ‘wearable muslin’! I’ve had this gold foiled navy linen in stash for ages; I could never figure out just what it should become.

Sew House 7 Remy Raglan in foiled linen

I chose to sew size 12, with a forward shoulder alteration. I now realise that a high rounded back/forward head alteration would probably have been fine, but this has still worked okay! I sewed it with french seams throughout (good grief).  The pattern comes in a size range from 00 to 36.

Sew House 7 Remy Raglan in foiled linen

I had a vintage button in stash that works really nicely at the neckline. I don’t have to undo the button to get this on and off; it just slips over my head. If I was sewing this again I would lengthen the 3/4 sleeve a little more and reshape the lower sleeve to be a bit wider for an easier roll up. Although the pattern has designed to be worn with the sleeves rolled up, the longer sleeve still tapers a bit toward the sleeve hem. This makes rolling up a little more difficult!

Sew House 7 Remy Raglan in foiled linen

I can tell that this pattern will get plenty of use once the weather has warmed up a bit. You can see a beautiful colour/print blocked version sewn by Anna here.

adult's clothing · miscellaneous · musings · sewing

Style Arc Loren in orange

Another pattern repeat!  This one is the Style Arc Loren coat – you can see my first version here; I really like the way that it fits and I wear it often.

Style Arc Loren jacket in upholstery fabric

This version is also size 12, but made from a vastly different fabric type. This is a thick fabric that looks like a boucle on one side, but has long floating threads in a different colour on the other. I wonder if it is an upholstery fabric? I picked it up at Restash, so have not real idea of composition or anything else. It frayed terribly and I finished the edges of each piece on the overlocker before I started joining it to another.

Style Arc Loren jacket in upholstery fabric

Style Arc Loren jacket in upholstery fabric

The thickness of the fabric meant that I needed to hand-stitch the patch pockets to the front, and hand stitch the coat hem and the sleeve hems.

Style Arc Loren jacket in upholstery fabric

There’s a lot that I like about this coat, but there’s a lot that could have been improved. Note that the pattern itself is designed to be sewn in a range of fabrics and the instructions are perfectly fine. It’s an unlined coat, and the person sewing it really needs to choose the appropriate sewing techniques and finishing options for the fabric that they have selected.

Style Arc Loren jacket in upholstery fabric

I’ll talk about the collar first. You can see in the above photo how the fabric sort of collapses upon itself, despite it’s thickness. I did grade the seams, but the entire front facing and collar area would have benefitted from me used more tailoring techniques. Some more interfacing, using a few types through the collar area, and definitely made some more adjustments for turn of cloth.

Style Arc Loren jacket in upholstery fabric

The same applies to the shoulders. Despite this being designed for a relaxed fit with an extended shoulder line, I could have considered a small shoulder pad and more sleeve head support.

Style Arc Loren jacket in upholstery fabric

What I will definitely go back and do (and should have done at the time, learning from the first Loren that I sewed) was to hand-stitch the facings in place down the entire front of the coat. It will make it hang so much better. I might even consider some closures.

Style Arc Loren jacket in upholstery fabric

From the Style Arc website: This easy fit essential jacket will become your favourite go to garment for all seasons and all occasions, this will only be defined by your choice of fabric. Featuring a slim shawl collar and optional patch or inseam pockets. This is a simply constructed pattern that can be made in wool suiting or linen for every day, knit for the weekend or for a touch of glamour make it in lurex fabric or for an on-trend look make it in faux fur.
FABRIC SUGGESTION: Wool, linen, ponte, crepe, faux fur, sweater knit or lurex.

loren-jacket

I will wear this coat, but it could have been better. Just a reminder to all of you to really consider what techniques you choose for each garment, depending on the fabric.

Style Arc Loren jacket in upholstery fabric

Most of you who read this blog know that I live in Melbourne.  We’re about to go back into covid-19 stage 3 restrictions again, from midnight tonight.  Back to only leaving home for food, for work if it can’t be done from home (so no change for us; we’re already working from home), for caring responsibilities, for daily exercise.  At this stage it’s for six weeks.  Clare still gets to go back to school on Monday (VCE students are continuing classes) but Stella gets an extra week of school holidays while the government figures out what happens next – I assume she’ll go back to remote learning.

This was expected really, watching the numbers go up and up and up over the past few weeks.  My plea to regional Victoria and the rest of the country: you also need to follow the rules and the recommendations!  When there are recommendations that you don’t travel, don’t!  When you are told to socially distance, do it!  We all know that it was when people began to get complacent and see more and more  and more family and friends in enclosed spaces and forgot about social distancing and hugged and kissed etc that this has become an issue again.  We all know that it’s hard – but it isn’t the random person in the supermarket that you’re most likely to catch this from; it’s your family and friends who you hug and forget to wash hands around.  Keep up with hygiene; keep on social distancing; minimise where you go and who you see.  You’re fortunate that you don’t have to go back into lockdown; ensure that it doesn’t happen by following the rules.

We’ve all seen how quickly this disease takes hold and we do still have a chance to keep it under control in Australia – but this will only happen if everyone considers the good of the community rather than their individual ‘rights’.  We all need to take responsibility.  So if you’re looking for me over the next six (at least) weeks, you know exactly where I’ll be!

 

 

adult's clothing · sewing

DIBY Club Adrianne sweater

The second time I used a DIBY Club pattern was just as successful as the first.  This time I gave the Adrianne sweater a try.

DIBY Club Adrianne Sweater in wool blend knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

This is a very interesting pattern, in that the curved hemline is finished with wide bands that overlap at the sides. There are quite a few layers there at the intersection and overlap.  I took it slowly and followed the instructions, and it sewed up without any incident.

DIBY Club Adrianne Sweater in wool blend knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

There is also a video tutorial for attaching the bands if you need it; the written instructions and diagrams worked successfully for me.

DIBY Club Adrianne Sweater in wool blend knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

The fabric is a soft, medium weight wool blend knit from Super Cheap Fabrics; it’s what I consider to be the ‘perfect’ green with a beautiful marle effect. They had a few colours available at the time, but they all sold out very quickly. I wish I had bought more, in different colours – it’s a lovely fabric both to sew and to wear.

DIBY Club Adrianne Sweater in wool blend knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

From the DIBY Club website: The Adrianne Open Side Slouchy Sweater PDF sewing pattern was designed to be incredibly comfortable, stylish and quick to sew. Its open side banded hem gives a fun and interesting twist on a slouchy favorite. PATTERN OPTIONS:

  • Necklines: Cowl Neck // Crew Neck // Boat neck with Facing
  • Sleeve Lengths: Short // Elbow // Three Quarter // Long

Adrianne open side slouchy sweater

The pattern comes in sizes 00 to 36, and the instructions have plenty of information on how to blend between sizes and how to made alterations to better fit your shape and measurements.  I guess that I sewed size 12, but would need to pull out the pattern pieces to check.  My sweater is the version with a faced boat neck and long sleeves.

DIBY Club Adrianne Sweater in wool blend knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

The faced boat neck gives it stability and a nice topstitched detail. I often find boat necklines a little too wide, but this one sits really nicely. The sleeves are finished with cuffs, which is a preferred option for me at the moment. The shaped centre back seam gives some nice contour so that the sweater isn’t baggy overall.  Construction was shared between the sewing machine and the overlocker.

DIBY Club Adrianne Sweater in wool blend knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

I’m quite keen to sew this pattern again, but am still dithering about which version and which stash fabric. I’d quite like to try a shorter sleeve in a lighter weight fabric for warmer weather, although that’s a long way away at the moment.

DIBY Club Adrianne Sweater in wool blend knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

This is definitely one of my favourite recent garments.

adult's clothing · sewing

Style Arc Como knit cardigan

I’m still working through my ‘nojourn’ garments.  The Style Arc Como knit cardigan is a repeat pattern – you can see my first version here.

Style Arc Como cardigan in knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

For this second version I took my own advice and used a more stable knit than the first time, as well as decent quality thread in the overlocker. I even remembered to shorten the sleeves at the cutting out stage – I could have shortened them a little more; they’re still a fraction long – and added the patch pockets this time around.
Style Arc Como cardigan in knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

The back seaming worked very nicely in this fabric. It’s a jacquard knit from Super Cheap Fabrics. It doesn’t appear to be on the website any longer. I have a feeling that when I ordered it, the description said that it was blue/navy – it’s not; it’s definitely grey! One of the perils of ordering fabric online is that some sites do a better job than others with both their photography and their fabric descriptions – colour, composition, fabric type etc. I’ve found a few times that what I have recieved from Super Cheap isn’t exactly what was described, as have other people that I know. From what I have heard they are very happy to refund etc if this happens, but I really do wish that it didn’t happen in the first place.

Style Arc Como cardigan in knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

The patch pockets are well placed for cardigan pockets. I paid careful attention when attaching the sleeeves to this cardi, remembering that last time I had issues with pulling, maybe partly due to the grain changes at the back armhole. I made sure that I didn’t have seam allowance bulk caught in the seamlines by stopping and starting my stitching just either side of the seamline intersections, leaving the seam allowances free. It has definitely helped with the comfort and the fit of this cardi.

Style Arc Como cardigan in knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

From the Style Arc website: This long-line fashionable cardi sewing pattern is a must have addition to your wardrobe. It has a cleverly designed all-in-one dropped shoulder line and a front band that hugs the neckline. This cardigan is finished off with two lovely large patch pockets. FABRIC SUGGESTION: Wool jersey, baby wool, sweater knit

como-knit-cardi

It seems that more grey garments are slowly appearing in my wardrobe – a bit like the grey appearing in my hair! It’s actually time for me to do another big clear out and decide on which garments that I want to keep. There’s a lot that hasn’t been worn this winter, especially clothes that I generally wear to work. It’s possibly time to only have a small capsule of work clothes, anticipating that eventually I will be doing some work back out on site, but mostly have non-work clothes. Time to figure out what my favourites are!

Style Arc Como cardigan in knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

adult's clothing · sewing

Papercut Patterns Pinnacle sweater

Back to another pattern that I’ve sewn before – the Papercut Patterns Pinnacle top/sweater. In the past I’ve sewn the woven top version (twice). I was especially happy with this version, which has been worn quite regularly, so thought that I’d give the pattern another go as a sweater.

Papercut Patterns Pinnacle sweater

I sewed it up during my May nojourn, from a printed double knit that I’d bought at Eliza Fabrics last year. It doesn’t have a great deal of stretch, but enough. I had some lightweight wool knit in stash in the perfect colour for the bands, but they turned out WAY too floppy. I put it aside, knowing that I needed to remove all of the bands and replace them with something a little more substantial, with plenty of recovery.

Papercut Patterns Pinnacle sweater

Despite lots of looking, I could not locate a rib in red or blue that matched the print, so finally went with black. I made the sleeve cuffs much narrower than the pattern piece, but I still reckon that they are a bit loose.  I sewed size S, which is smaller than suggested for my measurements.

Papercut Patterns Pinnacle sweater

I really don’t love the finished sweater, and will be passing it on to someone who will enjoy it more than I do. I did consider giving it another go in a softer sweater knit, but have decided that I have other patterns in my stash that I prefer for a sweater type of garment.

Papercut Patterns Pinnacle sweater

Given that I had sewn this pattern twice before, I didn’t find the construction too problematic. However, this is definitely not what others have found, and my quilting background may have helped me a little bit here too. Both Anna and Sarah have sewn the sweater version of this pattern, and noted that there don’t appear to have been any modifications to the woven top pattern to take fabric stretch into acount for the sweater. Interestingly, in mid-June (many weeks after Sarah’s Instagram discussion and associated blog post) I received an email from Papercut Patterns letting me know that the instructions for this pattern had been updated (they’d never informed me about any errata previously). The email also pointed out the Pinnacle top photographic tutorials on their website, but both these are for the woven top version; nothing for the knit sweater.

Papercut Patterns Pinnacle sweater

Papercut Patterns have been really popular, especially patterns like the Pinnacle top/sweater and the Sapporo coat, but recently I have been left wondering about the quality of the drafting. Most people have had to ‘tweak’ the patterns to make them work. Now it makes absolute sense that everyone makes alterations for their own shape and their personal style, but when the majority have problems with notches not matching up, or with matching points, or with linings being too short, or seams not matching up, it makes me hesitant to sew more of their patterns (and yes, I do have some unsewn ones in my stash).  It’s a shame; the style lines are terrific and they use some interesting shapes.  But I need to feel certain that everything will go together as it should.

Papercut Patterns Pinnacle sweater

In conclusion:  this is a well constructed top, in quality fabric, that I’m not going to wear, and I probably won’t use this pattern again in the sweater version for me.  I think that there are alternatives that are better for my shape.

adult's clothing · sewing

Grainline Studio Hemlock tee (updated)

I first sewed the Grainline Studio Hemlock tee back in 2013, when it was a free single-sized pattern.  I loved that tee!  Late last year an updated version of the pattern was released, with different sleeve and body lengths, and a size range from 0 – 30.  It’s still a free pattern, available when you subscribe to the Grainline newsletter (via the link at the bottom of their website).

Grainline Studio Hemlock tee in Obus knit

I decided to sew the size 12, in line with my measurements, in the mid length, with long sleeves. The fabric is the same Obus deadstock cotton/spandex that I used in the Sunday V-neck tee a couple of blog posts ago. This time I used one half of the fabric for the front, one sleeve and neckband, and the other half for the back and the other sleeve.

Grainline Studio Hemlock tee in Obus knit

The pattern description is as follows: The Hemlock is a drop shoulder boxy tee with just the right amount of drape. It offers three body lengths as well as three sleeve lengths so you can customise as you like. The simple silhouette works well with a wide variety of fabrics: jersey, sweater knit, stripes, prints, etc. We know it’s one of those pieces you’ll make again and again!

Hemlock tee line drawing

I constructed this tee on the overlocker, using the twin needle on the machine to secure the hems and to secure the seam allowances for the neckband.

Grainline Studio Hemlock tee in Obus knit

There’s really not a great deal more to say about this tee – it’s a great relaxed drop shouldered tee, it’s free, and there’s even a Hemlock video sewalong for it on the Grainline YouTube channel if you’re interested!

adult's clothing · sewing

DIBY Club Mae poncho sweater

This might be the first garment that I have sewn from pattern company DIBY Club.  DIBY stands for ‘do it better yourself’, rather than buying it from a shop.  They sell patterns for men, women and children, as well as offering classes and some sewing supplies.  There are quite a few free patterns on the website as well.  Patterns all come with layers for ease of printing, come in sizes 00 – 36, and have comprehensive instructions that include adjustment guides.

DIBY Club Mae poncho sweater in fabric from Super Cheap Fabrics

I chose the Mae poncho sweater as my first DIBY Club pattern. And I think that it’s terrific! Obviously, it’s super roomy, so fitting wasn’t a big issue. I think that I sewed the size 12, but would need to pull out the pattern to confirm that.

DIBY Club Mae poncho sweater in fabric from Super Cheap Fabrics

From the pattern website: The Mae Poncho Sweater is a chic way to keep warm and cozy! The women’s sewing pattern is made with all of your favorite fall options and includes an option to add belt openings for women who enjoy showing off a contoured shape will staying comfortable.

PATTERN OPTIONS

  • Necklines: Crew // Hood // Oversized Cowl
  • Fit: Open Sides // Closed Sides with Cuffs
  • Optional Belt Openings for Body Contour

SUITABLE FOR

  • Experienced beginner sewists and beyond
  • Sweater knits with 2-way stretch

DIBY Club Mae poncho sweater line drawing

As you can see, I chose to sew the option with the oversized cowl neckline, and closed sides with long cuffs/sleeves. The cuffs are doubled with the fold forming the sleeve opening, which is a really nice finish. And being slim, they help to balance out the volume of the body.

DIBY Club Mae poncho sweater in fabric from Super Cheap Fabrics

DIBY Club Mae poncho sweater in fabric from Super Cheap Fabrics

I imagine that fabric choice makes a significant difference to the success of this garment. It really does need to drape softly. I used a polyester/elastane medium weight (180GSM) knit from Super Cheap Fabrics. It’s currently available on their website.

DIBY Club Mae poncho sweater in fabric from Super Cheap Fabrics

The cowl is self-lined, and there’s plenty of fabric to fall into generous folds. Construction of this sweater was all on the overlocker, and as you can imagine it was extremely straightforward and fast to sew. I used the sewing machine to secure a simple zig-zag hem. I have found that I can comfortably fit a thermal top underneath this for additional winter warmth, while still having the slim fit sleeves feel comfortable. I’m very pleased with how this has turned out. There’s a version on the website with a solid body and striped sleeves/cowl that really appeals to me too. This won’t be the last time I use this pattern.

DIBY Club Mae poncho sweater in fabric from Super Cheap Fabrics