adult's clothing · sewing

BurdaStyle #101 10/2016 Knotted Shirt

Gee, I wish that Burda Style numbered and/or named things a little differently.  It’s hard to keep track!  This top is pattern #101 from the 10/2016 issue of Burda Style – you can find the pattern online here.

#101 Knotted shirt from Burda 10/2016 in viscose knitn from The Cloth Shop

Burda describe this top as follows: What is better than a knotted blouse? A knotted T-shirt! The ties on this shirt with its slightly shortened sleeves are cut on and faced and can be tied tighter or looser, depending on your mood.

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As with many of the Burda Style patterns, there is actually a dress pattern associated with this top pattern – so I suggest that you do what I did and buy the dress pattern!  Then you have the option of sewing either – they use the same pattern pieces (except a couple of extra ones for the dress).

#101 Knotted shirt from Burda 10/2016 in viscose knitn from The Cloth Shop

I used elastic in the lower back hemline, as per the instructions, but that really is more applicable for the dress version. I always find that I have to think a little more when sewing a Burda Style pattern – firstly to remember to add seam allowances, and secondly to work out just what the instructions are telling me!

#101 Knotted shirt from Burda 10/2016 in viscose knitn from The Cloth Shop

The ties are faced, then knotted. There is a teensy bit of origami involved in constructing the front of the top, but if you just slow down and take your time you shouldn’t have any issues. Size wise, I think I sewed the 40 – it’s a fairly oversized style though, so take that into account. I think that the line drawing is an accurate reflection of the pattern, moreso than the impression you get when looking at it on the tall slim broad shouldered model.

#101 Knotted shirt from Burda 10/2016 in viscose knitn from The Cloth Shop

The sublime viscose knit is from The Cloth Shop. It’s such a beautiful fabric to work with – medium weight, lovely drape, and surprisingly easy to handle. Burda suggest 100% cotton jersey knit for this top, but I feel that something with a little more drape is a better choice. And I adore the colour!

#101 Knotted shirt from Burda 10/2016 in viscose knitn from The Cloth Shop

Burda Style are always worth a look. Just remember that you’ll be taping those pdf patterns (or tracing them if you get the magazine), don’t forget to add seam allowances, and you may wish to have a couple of sewing reference books handy.

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adult's clothing · sewing

Style Arc Kylie top (again)

A (minor) miracle has occurred.  There is no longer anything in my already-cut-out-and-ready-to-sew box.  Nothing.  Nada.  Not one item.  That’s a big thing for me!  I tend to have cutting out frenzies, especially before I go away on a sewing weekend.  There can be up to twenty garments in that box at one time!  But no more.  It actually feels really freeing.  Until the next time I am prepping for a Sewjourn, that is.

Style Arc Kylie top in knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

Anyway, this top had been sitting in that box for a little while.  And as with many of the other garments that were sitting in the box, once I sewed it up I wondered why I’d waited for so long!

Style Arc Kylie top in knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

This is my second time sewing the Style Arc Kylie top. And co-incidentally my first one was recently the inspiration for a #sewcialists tribute challenge! Claire of Belle Citadel just sewed one for herself inspired by my striped version, which was very lovely (and flattering) of her. Well, here’s another.

Style Arc Kylie top in knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

Style Arc describe this pattern as follows: Fashionable and functional top. The overlay has a high low hemline and an opening down the back. This top can be made long or short sleeves therefore suitable for all seasons. Need a basic tee? – Just leave the overlay off.

kylie-top

I sewed size 12, but removed most of the waist shaping.  I especially like the overlay on this top.  It’s a lovely point of difference, and works really nicely on my shape.  The fabric is a soft, almost-but-not-quite sheer printed knit that I bought at Super Cheap Fabrics.  It doesn’t even require ironing – I should have bought more of it!  Great colours.  My only regret with this top is that I didn’t pay more attention to the fabric placement on the front – I don’t love that repeat of the blue and green target so close to one another.

Style Arc Kylie top in knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

This is an easy top to sew. The overlay piece is sewn first – shoulder seams, side seams, top centre back seam, then it’s all hemmed. The body of the top comes next; shoulder seams and side seams. Then I placed the overlay on top and treated it as one with the main body to apply the neckband. I had done it according to the instructions last time and had decided then that it would work just fine if I put the two layers together then attached the neckband. It means that the neckband seam allowance isn’t hidden between the two layers, but it sits better on me during wear.

Style Arc Kylie top in knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

I used lime green thread in the twin needle for securing all the hems and the neckband. Otherwise, construction was on the overlocker. This is a lovely style – I’m sure that I haven’t finished with this pattern just yet!

Style Arc Kylie top in knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

adult's clothing · Lekala · sewing

Lekala 4639 coat

This was the final garment I sewed at Sewjourn in May.  That was a highly successful Sewjourn – I sewed less items, but was very happy with nearly all of them!  It’s nice when it all works out that way.

Lekala 4639 coat in wool blend from Rathdowne Fabrics

Lekala 4639 is one of Lekala’s more recent offerings. I knew as soon as I saw it that I’d be making it! Their description of it is “coat”. Well, yes. They do suggest cashmere, gaberdine or tweed as the suggested fabrics.

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This is actually a fully lined coat, with the lining pattern pieces provided.  I can draft lining pieces if I have to, but the lazy in me much prefers it when somebody else has already done that work for me!  I used some slippery printed fabric that a friend whose husband works in the fashion industry had given me – I think that it was originally intended for scarves.

Lekala 4639 coat in wool blend from Rathdowne Fabrics

The main fabric was a remnant from Rathdowne Fabrics. It is a wool blend, and was very pleasant to work with. It sewed easily and pressed well. I did have to keep an eye out for fraying, but otherwise it was terrific. There are quite a lot of different colours in the weave, but overall it reads as fairly browny green.

Lekala 4639 coat in wool blend from Rathdowne Fabrics

Being a Lekala pattern, it was drafted to my measurements. And wow, that fit is just great! The lengths and the proportions are just right for me. I really do love that about Lekala! There is not a great deal of structure in this coat – just interfacing through the front panels and back neckline, as well as the in the sleeve facings. I didn’t even include shoulder pads, although it may have benefitted from a small one. You could definitely add them if required.

Lekala 4639 coat in wool blend from Rathdowne Fabrics

I chose to use large snaps as the fastenings instead of buttons. I also found that I needed to hand-sew the coat hem and the sleeve facings in place, or else they bagged down, even with the linings. The linings were of course a big larger than the coat to allow for movement, but this also allowed the narrowed hemline to fall down at first. A bit of hand sewing fixed that right up.

Lekala 4639 coat in wool blend from Rathdowne Fabrics

There are darts around the hemline that give this jacket its lovely cocoon shape. They aren’t hard to do – in fact, this wasn’t a difficult garment to assemble. Not all that many pieces, and they were all logically assembled. Lekela provide an order of construction rather than hand-holding instructions, but with a garment like this one (and plenty of years or sewing experience behind you, or a few good reference books) that really is all that you need. And a bit of common sense!

Lekala 4639 coat in wool blend from Rathdowne Fabrics

Once upon a time I would have laughed at coats with half or three quarter length sleeves, but nowadays I really like them! The shaping in this one is really nice, with the curve up to the underarm seam.  It doesn’t sit quite a perfectly as I’d like on the inside there – maybe I needed a bit more clipping and grading. The back neckline and shoulders fit nicely and there isn’t any obvious fabric pooling due to my short back waist, which is always a win – although with this coat style choice it shouldn’t have really been a problem anyway.

Lekala 4639 coat in wool blend from Rathdowne Fabrics

Overall, this coat is a BIG win for me and for Lekala. It’s a very current style, and it fits me so well! If you haven’t taken a look at Lekala or Bootstrap patterns yet (they use the same software) I really recommend that you do. They release new styles regularly, and with a bit of trial and error regarding style ease (there’s generally not much!) you end up with fit that you can rely on. And did I mention the price point? Very reasonable – especially if you buy a pattern bundle.

Lekala 4639 coat in wool blend from Rathdowne Fabrics

adult's clothing · sewing · Uncategorized

Cashmerette Dartmouth knit top

I am becoming more and more keen on Cashmerette patterns.  I recently sewed up another version of the Springfield top (will hopefully blog that one soon) and the fit was SO good without any alterations!  My Appleton dresses and tops have had quite a bit of wear, and I’m looking forward to giving the Webster dress a go soon as well.  Although I sew the smallest size of the Cashmerette range, I am definitely shaped in a “plus size” way, and what appears to be a built in forward shoulder and sway back alteration please me greatly.

Cashmerette Dartmouth top in knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

This is the Cashmerette Dartmouth knit top. The pattern description is as follows: Dreaming of a pattern that is casual and chic? Look no further than the Dartmouth Top! This cross-over jersey top comes with two variations—a classic fixed wrap or modern ruched front—and features three sleeve lengths and a gape-free banded neckline. Whether made in a cozy sweater knit or slinky silk jersey, the Dartmouth is the perfect partner for your favorite pair of jeans! RECOMMENDED FABRIC: Mid-weight knit fabric, such as cotton or rayon jersey, with at least 50% stretch. Also suitable for light to mid-weight sweater knits. 

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Now, I know that there are a million patterns out there for tops like this.  BUT, there aren’t a million of them out there drafted for shapes like mine.  I sewed size 12 C/D, graded out to a larger size through the waist, and I also folded out a couple of inches at waist level from the overall length of the pattern.

Cashmerette Dartmouth top in knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

The fabric was leftovers from a dress I made earlier in the year – a slippery poly/spandex knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics. I love the print, but it does show every bit of muffin top from the elastic waistband of the pants underneath.

Cashmerette Dartmouth top in knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

The wide band around the neckline helps the top to sit nicely. This is the version with ruching at the side seams.

Cashmerette Dartmouth top in knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

This is a simple but well drafted pattern, and the instructions are very clear. I can see why Cashmerette patterns are become very popular. Even though some of the styles aren’t my cup of tea, there’s definitely a sizeable market for this range.

adult's clothing · DCF Challenge · sewing

Tessuti Kyoto vest – DCF Winter Challenge

Every three months I go for a little wander around Darn Cheap Fabrics to see what catches my fancy for our DCF seasonal challenge*.  When I spotted this double-sided scuba/knit I knew straight away that it was what Emma and I would sew with for winter.

Tessuti Kyoto Vest in double sided scuba/jersey from Darn Cheap Fabrics

I really liked the sponginess of this fabric as well as the colour combinations. There were actually about six different colour combinations, all scuba one side bonded to jersey on the other, but it was the navy scuba/blue-grey jersey that spoke to me the most.

Tessuti Kyoto Vest in double sided scuba/jersey from Darn Cheap Fabrics

I decided on a pattern very quickly – the Tessuti Kyoto vest. It was the perfect choice for a double-sided fabric like this one. And the simplicity of the design and the seaming techniques mean that it is completely reversible.

Tessuti Kyoto Vest in double sided scuba/jersey from Darn Cheap Fabrics

I chose to sew the long version of the pattern. Tessuti describe the Kyoto vest as follows: This simple, shawl-collared wrap vest features bound edges and armholes. Effortlessly stylish, Kyoto is the ideal layering piece for the cooler months and can be worn over dresses, tops and shirts. The pattern includes options for both a short or long length. Version A is ideal for boiled wool knits or boiled felted wools and Version B for double-sided woven wools or wool blends.

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As you can probably see, I didn’t finish the edges with binding.  In fact, I didn’t finish the edges at all!  This fabric really doesn’t need it – in fact, it’s one of the features of the fabric.  Leaving the edges raw meant that the centre back collar seam and shoulder/neckline seam were highlighted.

Tessuti Kyoto Vest in double sided scuba/jersey from Darn Cheap Fabrics

You need to be careful with pattern selection for these types of fabrics. They have loads of body, and although this is a knit fabric so feels soft and snuggly, it also has a great deal of substance.  Stitches sink into it but it could get bulky very quickly.

Tessuti Kyoto Vest in double sided scuba/jersey from Darn Cheap Fabrics

It only took around an hour to make this vest, including cutting out time, mostly because I chose to leave all the edges raw. I wouldn’t necessarily make the same choice for a different fabric, but think that it worked just fine for this one.

Tessuti Kyoto Vest in double sided scuba/jersey from Darn Cheap Fabrics

Choosing the right size is really about getting the shoulder width that you prefer – nothing else matters all that much with this style. It’s a big circle!

Tessuti Kyoto Vest in double sided scuba/jersey from Darn Cheap Fabrics

After some experimentation I decided that I actually prefer to wear this vest with a pin to hold it closed. I haven’t yet decided which side I prefer to have as the “right” side (because as with most convertible/reversible things, I bet that I’ll end up wearing it one way most of the time). This has been a snuggly addition to my wardrobe and has already had a bit of wear. You can check out what Emma sewed over here – and yes, great minds do think alike!

Tessuti Kyoto Vest in double sided scuba/jersey from Darn Cheap Fabrics

* Emma and I started the DCF Seasonal Challenge a year or two ago – we buy  a couple of metres of the same fabric from Darn Cheap Fabrics each season, and each make a garment.  We then reveal it on our blogs on the same day.  It’s just a fun thing that we started when we realised how often we buy and sew the same fabrics (often from Darn Cheap).

adult's clothing · sewing · tween

Style Arc Josie hoodie

Every time I see Clare wearing this I say “nice hoodie”.

Style Arc Josie hoodie in quilted knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

This is one of those times where I got the fabric and pattern combination exactly right! The quilted knit was from Darn Cheap Fabrics, but I’m pretty sure that I’ve spotted it at other fabric shops around Melbourne too. It was bought with a garment for me in mind, but Clare snaffled it instead. That is beginning to happen more and more often…

Style Arc Josie hoodie in quilted knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

I lined the hood with a striped pique knit remnant that I’d picked up somewhere around the traps (maybe from the Sewjourn exchange bin?) which was both the perfect weight and colourway to coordinate with the quilted knit. I used the same striped knit for the hemline facing.

Style Arc Josie hoodie in quilted knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

Style Arc Josie hoodie in quilted knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

Style Arc describe the Josie hoodie as follows:  This designer raglan sleeve hoody with its shaped corded hemline, along with the beautifulfunnel neck hood, is a perfect trans seasonal top. FABRIC SUGGESTION Baby Wool, Sweater Knit, Fleecy.

josie-hoody

I sewed size 4 for Clare.  I was concerned that the arms would be a bit too long as drafted, and we did shorten them after trying it on.  The shoulder darts give a really nice fit across the shoulders.  Raglan sleeves really do benefit from that dart!

Style Arc Josie hoodie in quilted knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

Clare didn’t want the cord in the hemline, which made sewing this hoodie that little bit faster. I’d say that this has been one of Clare’s most regularly worn winter garments.

Style Arc Josie hoodie in quilted knit from Darn Cheap Fabrics

adult's clothing · sewing

Pyjama time – Butterick 6296 pants

Every few years I sew myself a couple of new sets of pyjamas.  I have worked out over time that my favourite style of winter pyjama is flannelette pants with a long sleeved tee.

Winter pyjamas - Butterick 6296 pants with Deer & Doe Plantain tee

And in the interests of keeping this blog real – as you can tell, these photos are taken when I got up in the morning after a night’s sleep in the pyjamas (and no, clearly I don’t wear a bra to bed. As I said, keeping things real).

Winter pyjamas - Butterick 6296 pants and Sewaholic Renfrew tee

I decided to give a new pattern a try for the pyjama pants this year. I used Butterick 6296, which has pockets and an interesting curved back yoke.

Winter pyjamas - Butterick 6296 pants with Deer & Doe Plantain tee

Winter pyjamas - Butterick 6296 for the pants

I had a bit of trouble deciding what size to sew. In the end I sewed size 14. I also removed a couple of inches from the length of the main leg pieces. Looking at these photos it seems as though the centre back seam is pulling or giving me a bit of a wedgie, but the pants don’t feel that way in wearing. It could be my proportionally larger tummy pulling the fabric forward.

Winter pyjamas - Butterick 6296 pants with Deer & Doe Plantain tee

Winter pyjamas - Butterick 6296 pants and Sewaholic Renfrew tee

The flannelette for both pairs of pants comes from Spotlight. I have seen the fox one on lots of social media this year – it’s obviously been very popular. I originally bought enough of the foxy print to sew a pyjama top as well, but Clare has decided that she needs it instead and I remembered that as much as I like the idea of a pyjama shirt/pants combination, I prefer a tee!

From the pattern website: Very loose-fitting top has collar, forward shoulder seams, pockets, and stitched hems. B: Pocket bands. Straight-leg shorts and pants (below waist) have elasticized waistband, side-front pockets, and yoke back. Sleeves A, B and hems C, D: Bands. Purchased piping.

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b6296

As I have come to expect with any pattern designed by Liesl Gibson, the pattern was well designed with nice details and drafting.  I used a strip of mustard knit from the tee scraps to detail the pocket openings and cuffs of the dandelion print pants as flat piping; the foxy print pants have a strip of coordinating linen used as flat piping as well.  The topstitching details were done in contrasting threads.

Winter pyjamas - Butterick 6296 pants with Deer & Doe Plantain tee

The mustard tee is a Deer and Doe Plantain. I’ve used this pattern a number of times, cutting across size lines to get the fit I prefer. It’s sewn on the overlocker, with a zig zag stitch used for hems and to secure the neck band.

Winter pyjamas - Butterick 6296 pants and Sewaholic Renfrew tee

The apricot/orange tee is a Sewaholic Renfrew tee, also cut across size lines for fit. It was sewn on the overlocker with grey thread, and I used grey thread for twin needling around the neckline as well. That was all in an effort to make it more of a “set” with the pants.

Winter pyjamas - Butterick 6296 pants and Sewaholic Renfrew tee

This top is so fast to sew – using bands to finish the sleeves and hem is really quick and means that nearly everything can be done on the overlocker. I shortened the sleeves a bit by taking a fold out of the pattern piece before cutting, but these are still a fraction on the long side. I just turn up the cuffs.

Winter pyjamas - Butterick 6296 pants with Deer & Doe Plantain tee

I recently treated myself to a new (shop bought) dressing gown that coordinates very nicely with both sets of pyjamas, so am now feeling very swish. My last lot of winter sleepwear lasted about three years. Let’s see how this lot goes!

Winter pyjamas - Butterick 6296 pants and Sewaholic Renfrew tee