adult's clothing · sewing

Concord tee and York pinafore

I didn’t plan to sew these two pieces as an outfit – but I’ve discovered that they work together beautifully.

Cashmerette Concord tee and Helens Closet York pinafore

The striped tee came first. It’s the Cashmerette Concord tee, the scoop neck and long cuffed sleeve version, in size 12C/D. And I don’t have any photos of it without the pinafore over it. Oh well.

Cashmerette Concord tee and Helens Closet York pinafore

From the Cashmerette website:  Meet the Concord, your new favorite tee! Fully customizable, this knit T-Shirt is a classic wardrobe staple that’s designed for curves. Choose from three hem lengths (cropped, mid-length or long curved), three necklines (high, V-neck, or scoop), three sleeve lengths (short, medium, or long), two sleeve finishes (cuffed or hemmed), and optional sleeve tabs. Whether you layer them over jeans on Friday night, or pair them with floral skirts at the office, you’ll want a closet of Concords!

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I sewed the the curved and faced hemline.  I possibly wouldn’t both again; I’d just do a regular straight hem on this.  I find that the facing creates a ridge – possibly a combination of the fabric type and my body.  I shortened the tee before cutting it out by taking out a fold from the front and the back – it’s very long as drafted considering that I have a short torso.  The fabric is a viscose/spandex (possibly also some cotton in there) that I bought from Rathdowne Fabrics a year or so again.  They’re great colours!  As always, I took care when cutting out that the stripes were aligned, and I used a fair number of pins during construction to make sure that they were.

Cashmerette Concord tee and Helens Closet York pinafore

My overall verdict on the tee pattern is a definite thumbs up. I really like the fit around the upper chest and shoulders, and the scoop is perfect for me. As always I used this tutorial to get the neckband length correct, and I used a twin needle to secure it after I’d attached it to the tee. So, on to the pinafore.

Cashmerette Concord tee and Helens Closet York pinafore

The York pinafore was definitely an impulse buy and sew. I think I may have sewn it the weekend that the pattern was released. The cocoon shape and the overall simplicity really appealed to me (once I got past the initial ‘you’re fifty, you can’t wear a denim pinafore’ thought).

Cashmerette Concord tee and Helens Closet York pinafore

From the Helen’s Closet website: The York Pinafore is a playful addition to your handmade wardrobe. It is easy to layer over tank tops for summer or turtlenecks and leggings for colder weather. The York Pinafore is a modern take on a classic pinafore dress with a cocoon shape and two views. View A features large scoop pockets, a dipped neckline, and comes to the knee. View B is a shorter length with a high neckline and a kangaroo pocket. Recommended Fabrics: Medium to heavy weight woven fabrics such as cotton twill, denim, wool, linen, corduroy, and canvas. Crisp lightweight fabrics such as cotton and lightweight linen can also be used for a warm-weather pinafore. Drapier fabrics such as tencel twill, wool crepe, rayon crepe, or viscose poplin work well if you prefer a softer, less structured look.

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This pattern didn’t take long to tape.  I decided to sew view A, the longer version with the lower scooped neckline and the curved pockets.  I love those pockets!

Cashmerette Concord tee and Helens Closet York pinafore

Now, what size did I sew? Hmmmm, racking my brain. Probably the Large (12-14).  I did shorten the shoulder straps an inch, and after I sewed up and tried on the pinafore I went back and took another two inches from the length by folding over the hem for a second time. By the way, the fabric is dark brown denim with a teensy bit of stretch, from Rathdowne Fabrics remnant bins. I love those remnant bins.  I made my own bias tape from printed quilting cotton to finish the curved armhole and neckline edges. I like using bias tape like a facing – it works so nicely around curves, although you do need to ensure that you shape and press with plenty of steam as you go.

Cashmerette Concord tee and Helens Closet York pinafore

I really, really like this outfit. I feel good in it, it’s easy to wear, and layers well under my bright green merino Tessuti Megan cardigan and a scarf. I’ve worn it to a few events since I sewed it, and it is very me. I will definitely be using both patterns again (I have some wool earmarked for the pinafore already – I’ll use the same pattern pieces to cut a full lining so that it doesn’t stick to my tights). Definitely recommended.

adult's clothing · sewing

Laura has a Tonic with Parker

A couple of old patterns with a newer one! I’ve mentioned before that I like to sew entire outfits, where possible. Less wardrobe orphans that way!

Style Arc Laura cardigan, Parker ponte pants, and SBCC Tonic 2 Tee

So, let’s start at the bottom – which is the newest of these patterns. The pants are the Style Arc Parker Ponte Pant. They actually sold these in a bundle with a top and coat pattern. I purchased the whole bundle, but haven’t sewn up the top or coat yet.

Style Arc Parker ponte pant

From the Style Arc website: You will love the simplicity of this new ponte pant shape. This style features an elastic waist and a straight cuffed leg which sits on the ankle. Trendy, comfortable and an easy sew.

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This pattern is designed for ponte, and that’s what I used. This is a beautiful quality navy ponte that came to me from a generous friend. Ponte is one of those fabric that varies wildly in quality. In general I try to buy ponte that doesn’t contain polyester. I find that poly ponte pills extremely quickly and just doesn’t wear well. This ponte is divine – I’m not sure of the fibre composition, but it’s beautiful to sew, wear and washes well too!

Style Arc Parker ponte pant

I generally sew size 10 in Style Arc pants, but since I got larger I am experimenting with sewing size 12 pants instead. These are size 12, with the legs shortened about an inch and half by taking a fold out. I think that this pattern had a handy lengthen/shorten line on it. Otherwise I sewed them without alteration, mostly on the overlocker. Only the angled upper front detail needed the sewing machine.

Style Arc Parker ponte pant

The waistband is nice and wide, with wide elastic inside it. These pants are super comfortable to wear. I’ve decided to try sewing another pair in stretch corduroy – we’ll see how that goes!

Style Arc Parker ponte pants and SBCC Tonic 2 Tee

So, to the striped tee. The pattern for this one is the SBCC Tonic Two. I think – but am not certain – that I cut the neckline a bit lower, using another pattern as a guide. I’m very pleased with the finished depth for a long sleeved tee – not too high, not too low.

SBCC Tonic 2 Tee in soft knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

This fabric is absolutely scrumptious to wear. It’s a viscose/spandex knit that I picked up at Super Cheap Fabrics. It’s incredibly soft next to the skin. I did make sure to match the stripes when cutting and sewing – a pin in each stripe, then straight to the overlocker. Just don’t forget to pull those pins out before the fabric gets to the blade!

Style Arc Parker ponte pants and SBCC Tonic 2 Tee

My young photographers don’t always tell me when my clothes are caught up on my bum. Size wise, I think that I blended between sizes with this one, cutting the shoulders a size smaller than the bust and removing the waist shaping. The Tonic 2 tee is a free pattern by the way, as is the sister pattern Tonic that has short sleeves and a lower neckline. From the website: The Tonic 2 T-shirt is your new go to layering piece. If you loved the Tonic Tshirt, this is the next step up. The Tonic 2 has the same great fit but with updated details. This is a perfect transitional piece for your wardrobe in between seasons as you layer it or wear it alone. The Tonic 2 features a long, slim sleeve, and a crew neckline. Also, the body length is hip level for petites, but the good news is this will also work for regular height gals as well. Make the Tonic 2 out of any two way stretch jersey in solid or that fancy print you have been saving.

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SBCC patterns are designed for short people, so I really should pull this pattern out more often! The armhole depth on this tee works really nicely for me. The patterns also cover a significant size range.

Style Arc Laura cardigan

So last, but definitely not least, we come to the Style Arc Laura knit cardi. This pattern is one of the first Style Arc patterns that I ever bought and sewed. From the website: This simple shawl collar cardi is suitable for a knit drapable fabric. FABRIC SUGGESTION & DESCRIPTION Any knit fabric with plenty of stretch.

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The fabric that I used is fairly open and loosely knitted. Definitely a fabric that benefitted from the overlocker! What is missing from the line drawing is the centre back seam in the ‘hood’. From experience I know to sew that seam WRONG sides together – as when the cardi is worn the inside of the ‘hood’/collar is exposed. So that’s what I did – sewed it wrong sides together on the overlocker, then pressed it gently to one side and stitched it down on the machine, a bit like a flat felled seam. The rest of the construction was on the overlocker. This is a very quick cardi to sew.

Style Arc Laura cardigan

The instructions suggest that the edges are finished with a rolled edge on the overlocker. I decided to turn a 1cm hem over twice and secure it with a zig-zag stitch on the sewing machine instead, which gave me a really neat edge that also added a nice amount of weight to the bottom of the cardi. I made sure that the zig-zag was right along the fold, especially important as this fabric is pretty sheer.

Style Arc Laura cardigan, Parker ponte pants, and SBCC Tonic 2 Tee

This isn’t a warm winter cardi, but one that will provide that little bit extra when needed throughout much of the year. I find that the Laura cardi is a great pattern for knits that are a bit more difficult to handle – there are minimal seams, and because the edge finishing is simple – no bands etc – it’s not hard to get an effective result.

adult's clothing · sewing

Love Notions Canyon Cardigan

Over month between blog posts.  That was unintended.  Most of us go silent when life is full-on – either in good ways or in bad ways.  The last couple of months have been particularly intense for me, both with good things and with others that have been and will continue to be extremely challenging.  That is what life is, I think.  It’s full of ups and downs, and they can all coincide.  The older I get – and YES! I turned fifty a couple of weeks ago! – the more that I realise that life is complicated, it’s often very difficult, and it has moments of joy and delight.  Overall I am very fortunate, I know that.  It’s so important to make sure that those people that are important to you know that they are important, and why.  And while planning for the future, don’t forget to make the most of now. Because really, now is what we have.

Love Notions Canyon Cardigan in textured knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

I sewed this up a couple of months ago – yes, I am that far behind with blogging. Oh for the days when I would sew something and get it photographed and blogged pretty much immediately! The pattern is the Love Notions Canyon Cardigan.  From the website: The Canyon Cardigan is a great, transitional piece for your wardrobe. Three views are included; the skirt portion of the cardigan can be changed while the bodice stays the same. This cardigan is a more fitted style perfect for light layering with subtle shaping at the waist and center back. The three views included: a-line, gathered, and waterfall. All three are meant for stretch fabrics. Three sleeve lengths are included as well: vest, 3/4, and long. Also included are optional pockets and elbow patches.

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I have a couple of cardigan patterns that I really love and have sewn multiple times – the Style Arc Simone and Style Arc Coral – but every now and then it’s nice to add something slightly different to the mix.  I chose to sew the long sleeved cardigan with the A-line body.  I left out the pockets.

Love Notions Canyon Cardigan in textured knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

The fabric came from Super Cheap Fabrics. It’s a knit, with textured self-stripes. Looked at close up it appears to be two layers, with the top layer folded into the self-stripes of different widths that are held in place by the lower layer. I’d love to see the machines in operation constructing this! It’s quite spongy and thick, and is probably highly polyester in fibre content.

Love Notions Canyon Cardigan in textured knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

I sewed size Large, which was definitely a size too big for me. I’m still figuring out what sizes work best on my fatter-than-it-used-to-be shape. One of the things that I love about Love Notions patterns is that they show many, many sample garments on all sorts of shapes and sizes. It’s helpful to see how they fit and drape on different people. I need to choose the size of my tops mostly on upper bust and shoulder width, and make sure that they are styles that will accommodate my mid-section (or grade them up through the stomach). The shoulder width on the Large is much wider than I need.  I recently has a three dimensional body scan done, and will share my learnings from that with you later in a future blog post. It’s really helpful to properly look at yourself when you’re a sewer!

Love Notions Canyon Cardigan in textured knit from Super Cheap Fabrics

There aren’t many pieces to this cardigan, and I doubt that I paid much attention to the instructions. Construction was primarily on the overlocker, with the sewing machine used for the twin-needled hems.  I did need to shorten the sleeves quite a bit – and my arms aren’t especially short – but otherwise I didn’t make any changes. I think that it’s a nice style with a few interesting options, and well worth adding to my pattern arsenal, although I’d sew a smaller size in the future.

adult's clothing · sewing

New Look 6343 – the Goldilocks top

Still on my scrap-busting mission, I paired a quilted knit with an interesting surface printed one to create a top based on New Look 6343.

The evolution of New Look 6343 in remnants

I used the quilted knit for the body, and the lighter weight printed jersey for the sleeves and neckband. The neckband is a strip of selvage. I got the idea from a Tilton sisters Craftsy class I’d done a little while ago. It utilises the natural roll along the selvage. I really like it (even though it would have been better with the neckband seam located somewhere else.

The evolution of New Look 6343 in remnants

This pattern has an interestingly shaped armscye. It’s New Look 6343, also known as ‘Misses knit tunic in two lengths, and top’. I can’t find it on the Simplicity site to link to it, but here it is on Pattern Review.  I wonder if it’s recently gone out of print?

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6343line

Essentially I sewed view D with view B sleeve length and cuffs.  The cuffs were sewn from the quilted knit, the same as the body.  My top was slightly longer than view D, as I know that cropped isn’t my favourite length, but my remnant was quite small and really dictated how long I could make it.  Anyway, when I tried it on, it was obvious that it was TOO SHORT.  The top ended right in the centre of my belly’s greatest convex curve.  Not a look that I felt comfortable with.  So I ferreted through the remaining scraps of the sleeve/neckband knit, and added a panel to the front and the back of the top to alter it to tunic length.

The evolution of New Look 6343 in remnants

Although that was much better in terms of tummy coverage, when I tried it on it was apparent that the top was now TOO LONG. The proportions of different fabrics just weren’t pleasing! So after more thought – trying to decide whether to ditch it completely or to keep on tweaking – I cut the length of the bottom panels in half, following the shaping of the main body hemlines. And what do you know – now it was pretty much JUST RIGHT!

New Look 6343 in remnants

I am not actually much of a pattern alterer (is that a word?) – I tend to sew something up, and either wear it as is or give it away if it doesn’t work. This was a really good reminder that it doesn’t take long to change things a little bit and end up with a vastly improved end product.

New Look 6343 in remnants

The overall fit is quite pleasing, but I have my usual short-back-waist length issues at centre back (as usual, exacerbated by my waist measurement being mostly located on the front half of my body). And grey. Grey is not my best colour. However, I love the texture of the body and cuffs and the splodgy pattern on the sleeves and lower panel!

New Look 6343 in remnants

Sewing notes – I think that this was size 14. As always, what others describe (generally in a derogatory tone) as ‘shapeless’ and ‘boxy’ is actually a great shape for my figure type that doesn’t include a defined waist as it has good shoulder and upper chest fit. Most construction was on the overlocker, although I used the sewing machine a fair bit as well. I think that this is a good pattern to have in your pattern library – those armscyes are really very nice and elevate the usual knit top/tunic pattern a little bit above the norm.

adult's clothing · sewing

Union St Tee

I have SO many tee patterns.  Some for summer, some for winter, some for layering, others to be worn alone.  They all vary a little bit in cut and in fit.  You really would think that I would have settled on a few favourites by now – and actually, I do have a few favourites – but I continue to try new ones.

Hey June Patterns Union St Tee in remnants

This one is the Hey June Handmade Union St Tee. This appears to be a very popular pattern – I’ve seen it a lot on blogs and instagram. And now that I’ve sewn it, I think that it is popular with good reason.

Hey June Patterns Union St Tee in remnants

I have a feeling that I sewed the size large, but it could have been a medium. I usually choose my size based on finished measurements. This tee is loose through the mid-section (hooray!) so I presume that I was only interested in fitting shoulders/neck and bust. There is every chance that I cut size medium through the shoulders and neckline then size large through the body – I often blend sizes that way.  I cut the regular front, but there is a full bust option.  The pattern ranges in size from XXS to 3XL, which I think is rather impressive!

Hey June Patterns Union St Tee in remnants

The fabrics are scraps from stash. I can’t really remember where either one came from, although I think that the textured body knit was from Darn Cheap Fabrics. The sleeves are cut from a soft mesh-like knit. I decided to finish the sleeves with cuffs cut from the body fabric. The hem and neckline are secured with a twin needle, and the rest of the construction was on the overlocker.

Hey June Patterns Union St Tee in remnants

This is a tee that I think works nicely on my shape. I chose the scooped neckline version, but the pattern also has a V and a crew neckline option. From the pattern website: The Union St. Tee is a great wardrobe basic to have in your pattern stash.  It comes with the option for a v-neck, scoop neck, or crew neck, and has four sleeve lengths included – short, elbow, 3/4, and long.  There is an optional chest pocket and a separate front piece that has been adjusted for a full bust (FBA).

The Union St. Tee is incredibly versatile depending on what options you choose, your fabric, and any embellishments you choose to add.  Embroider, applique, screen print, stencil, dye, sequin – this tee is a perfect blank slate for anything you can dream up.

The measurement chart and the instructions in the pattern will show you how to measure your high bust to pick your correct size and determine if you need the full bust adjustment.  Because the Union St. Tee starts at size XXS, it is suitable for tweens – adults.

The Union St. Tee pattern works well with cotton and cotton blend jerseys, as well as rib knit, interlock, waffle knit, rayon lycra, or even stretch lace!  Anything with a stretch of at least 30% will work, but 50 – 100% stretch is best.  Just remember – the smaller the stretch percentage, the more fitted your shirt will be, so plan accordingly.

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As usual, I used the method from Gillian’s tutorial to get the neckband length right so that it sits flat. I find this an almost foolproof way to attach knit neckbands, especially those cut from the same fabric as the rest of the tee.  It works especially well with necklines that have a fair bit of scoop at the front in comparison to the back – it distributes the stretch better than just quartering and pinning both the neckline and the neckband.

Hey June Patterns Union St Tee in remnants

I will mostly be wearing this as a layering piece. The green tinged yellow works well with many of the other garments in my wardrobe. Another great tee pattern to add to the arsenal! And yes, I’ve had a change of hair style with a red refresh as well. I’m really enjoying the shorter look!

adult's clothing · sewing

Style Arc Eden dress

The Style Arc Eden dress was the last garment that I made at Sewjourn a few weeks ago.  I suspect that it is my favourite.

Style Arc Eden dress in double sided striped knit from Clear It

This is the type of dress that I wear constantly in cooler weather. I really love to pull on a knit dress that is loose through the mid-section, and pair it with warm tights and boots, and snuggly singlet or slip underneath, and then a cardi or jacket over the top when I go out. And as much as I admire all the statement sleeves that have been around lately, you really can’t beat a classic fitted sleeve for wearability – it goes under things so much better!

Style Arc Eden dress in double sided striped knit from Clear It

I do love a stripe, but I’m not as excited about stripe matching. As always, most stripe matching success starts at the cutting out stage. It’s so important to have all those pattern pieces lined up correctly! This dress required stripe matching of the sleeve seam, the centre front and centre back seams, and at the lower side seams. I pinned the pieces together every fourth stripe or so, then happily overlocked away (yes, removing the pins before they got to the blade of course) and it worked rather well. Some of the alignment is half a millimetre or so off, but I’m not concerned about that.

Style Arc Eden dress in double sided striped knit from Clear It

Of course, mixing stripe widths on the right side of the fabric definitely removed some of the stripe matching pressure! This fabric is a double sided knit, one side with the wider stripes and the other side with the narrower ones. It came from Clear It, and I’ve actually made quite a number of garments from it over the past couple of years. There’s even one last garment cut out! It’s easy to sew and comfortable to wear, and I definitely enjoy playing with the stripe widths. I didn’t decide which side was going to be the right or wrong side for each part of the garment until I arrived at Sewjourn.

Style Arc Eden dress in double sided striped knit from Clear It

I used both the overlocker and the sewing machine when making this dress, depending on what part I was working on. The hems and the neck band are twin needled with a different colour in each needle (navy and orange). As usual, I secured the hems with double sided fusible tape before sewing. I was recently asked for more information on the double sided tape.

Vliesofix tape

I have a preference for the Vliesofix double sided tape, which comes in a few different widths – I have 6mm, 10mm and 25mm.   The 10mm and 25mm are my favourites.  It is double sided fusible tape cut to width and with backing paper attached.  You iron the non-paper side along the hemline, then peel off the backing paper, fold it over to where you want it, then iron the fabic again to secure it.  There are a few different brands, but I prefer the Vliesofix/Bondaweb one as I find that it is softer and doesn’t leave the fabric stiff. Stock up when you come across it – a quick google finds some (in more recent packaging) here.  Another good option is Wonder Tape, which you can use the same way and washes out of the fabric.  Anna has a terrific tutorial on hemming tricky knits, which shows how she uses Vliesofix tape.

Style Arc Eden dress in double sided striped knit from Clear It

Stella was my photographer this time, and she enjoyed taking photos at rather interesting angles! I sewed size 12, which pretty much corresponds with my bust/shoulder measurements and is what I’d buy in ready to wear for tops. I did shorten the sleeve pattern piece an inch, and folded about two inches out of the dress body pattern pieces to shorten it. I’m 158cm tall, for reference. I included the pockets in the angled front seams, as they can be cosy to put hands in. I am neither here nor there with pockets – sometimes I include them, sometimes I don’t. I know that some people are avid pocket fans – pockets in everything! – but I am a bag carrier and it doesn’t especially bother me not to have them. If they are there my mobile phone is the most likely thing to go in them (although let’s not forget #winepockets).

Style Arc Eden dress in double sided striped knit from Clear It

From the Style Arc website: This fabulous swing dress has a lovely fit-and-flair body shape. The hi-low hemline and V-neck make this dress a great on trend addition to your wardrobe. There are optional inseam pockets in the front angled seams. FABRIC SUGGESTION Jersey, baby wool, ITY.

eden-knit-dress

This would be super fast to sew in a solid, especially if you left out the pockets.  I suspect that this dress will become a cool weather staple.

Style Arc Eden dress in double sided striped knit from Clear It

I’ll have the camera back now Stella!

adult's clothing · sewing

Vogue 9275 tunic and Style Arc April pants

Those of you who follow me on Instagram know that I recently had a weekend away at Sewjourn.  I had a satisfyingly productive yet unrushed visit, very much sewing at my own pace.  There’s been a lot of talk around the socials lately about slow sewing, in contrast to fast sewing/fashion, which makes sense but which is often presented with a whole lot of judgemental overtone.  Meh.  Sewing is my hobby.  I get great enjoyment from it, it keeps me sane, and the outcome is clothing that fits me and works with my style and my lifestyle.  I reckon that it’s important to sew at your own pace!

Style Arc April pants in stretch bengaline with Vogue 9275 tunic in textured knit

Anyway, I sewed this tunic and pants on that Sewjourn weekend. The orange long-sleeved tee underneath is a Deer and Doe Plantain tee that I sewed from Clear It wool jersey ages ago. The tunic is made from textured knit that came from either Darn Cheap Fabrics or The Cloth Shop – I bought some from each! I used it for Clare’s Josie hoodie, and there was just enough left over for this tunic. Scrap busting again!

Style Arc April pants in stretch bengaline with Vogue 9275 tunic in textured knit

This is SUCH a great pattern. It’s Vogue 9275, a Vogue Wardrobe pattern.  A whole lot of simple designs, all well drafted and executed.  From the website: Very loose-fitting lined jacket has zip front and contrast collar, cuffs. Very loose-fitting pullover tunics have collar variations. Close-fitting pull-on leggings have front and back band at waist. Fitted pull-on pants have elastic at waist. B, C, E, Contrast A: For moderate stretch knits only. D: For four-way stretch knits only.

v9275_a

v9275

My version of the tunic is view B, but without the draw cord.  I sewed straight size Medium, which is Vogue size 12-14.  It’s pretty roomy.  I especially like the armhole facings – cut on, but nicely shaped – and the curved hemline.

Style Arc April pants in stretch bengaline with Vogue 9275 tunic in textured knit

I constructed this tunic on the sewing machine and finished the edges with the overlocker, other than the cowl which was directly attached to the body with the overlocker. Sewing it by machine allowed me to press open the shoulder seams and the side seams, which led to a much flatter and neater finish around the armholes. I used double sided fusible tape to secure the curved hemline in place before stitching it, and really recommend it if you are making this tunic.

Style Arc April pants in stretch bengaline with Vogue 9275 tunic in textured knit

Because the fabric is quite structured, the cowl collar stands up. I’d like to try sewing this again in a mid weight viscose knit, or a soft wool, and see how it drapes and collapses upon itself.

Style Arc April pants in stretch bengaline with Vogue 9275 tunic in textured knit

So, to the pants. These are the Style Arc April pants, one of Style Arc’s older patterns and one that I have sewn many, many times. I love the panelling – it lifts them above regular leggings, but still provides you with a fitted look. This pair is sewn in jacquard stretch bengaline, with the fabric reversed for the outer leg and inner leg panels. The effect is subtle, but the colouration is slightly different where I’ve used the reverse.

Style Arc April pants in stretch bengaline with Vogue 9275 tunic in textured knit

These were constructed on the overlocker, with topstitching beside each seamline to add some detailing. The waist is a simple ring of elastic overlocked to the top of the pants then turned to the inside and secured with stitching along each seamline. You know what I’m going to say next, don’t you – comfortable and easy to wear.  I sew these in size 10, with legs shortened around one and half inches and the waist elastic cut to the same measurement as the waist opening (it’s that negative ease keeping them up again).

From the Style Arc website: Up to minute stylized knit pull on pant, make it all one fabric, or contrast side panels as seen on the cat walk and in the fashion magazines. FABRIC SUGGESTION & DESCRIPTION Ponte or any stretch knit.

april-pant

I rather like to sew these pants in combinations of fabrics – bengaline and ponte, for example, or a print with a plain.  This pattern leaves quite a bit of room for creativity.

Style Arc April pants in stretch bengaline with Vogue 9275 tunic in textured knit

Both the tunic and the pants will work well with my casual winter wardrobe and my lifestyle.  The Vogue pattern will definitely get another outing.